AsianInfo.org supports I.C.E.Y. - H.O.P.E. (non-profit org)
(International Cooperation of Environmental Youth - Helping Our Polluted Earth) 

 

Countries / Regions


 

Viewer's Corner

 
Publish your story on AsianInfo.org - Personal experiences, opinions, articles, or any information related to Asia.  More Info...

 

Asianinfo Photo Gallery
Photos of Asia now available for purchase 

FREE Photos available!

IMG_0122 copy.JPG (69431 bytes)
Korea

Thailand

Indonesia


Malaysia

Hong Kong


Singapore

Japan

Shanghai


USA


Israel

 
 

Back to North Korea

 

Family Customs in Korea


The vast changes that have swept Asia and the rest of the world in the latter half of the 20th century have naturally been felt in the day-to-day lifestyle of every Korean.  Traditional customs and more have undergone a great deal of change due to the rapid modernization of society.  Despite these changes, however, there are those who maintain that Korea, for all its high-rise buildings, is still one of the most Confucian nations in the world.  The traditional ways of the past and the long-cherished customs continue to influence Koreans' newly acquired modern ways.

In the past, several generations often lived together, and many children were desired for the future stability and security of the family.  It was not unusual for the number of people sharing one house to total a dozen people or more.  In recent years, however, the move to urban areas and popularity of new apartment-type housing has meant that newly married couples tend to live on their own instead of sharing quarters with other family members.  This trend has given rise to an increasing number of nuclear families in Korea.

Traditionally, the eldest male of a family was regarded as the source of supreme authority.  All family members were expected to do what was ordered or desired by him.  Strict instruction were to be obeyed without protest.  It would have been unthinkable for children or grandchildren to place themselves in opposition to the wishes of their elders.  Obedience to one's superiors was deemed natural; in addition, filial piety in particular was viewed as the most revered of all Confucian virtues.  On the other hand, it was understood that the patriarch of the family would be fair in all matters relating to the discipline of family members.


 


Click Here...


AsianInfo.org supports I.C.E.Y. - H.O.P.E. (non-profit org)
(International Cooperation of Environmental Youth - Helping Our Polluted Earth)

 

 
 
 
Cheap Airline Tickets

Discount Hotels

Rental Car Deals

 


 

 
 
 
 
 
 

Disclaimer:  AsianInfo.org does not guarantee the complete accuracy of the information provided on this site or links.  Do your own research and get a professional's opinion before adhering to advice or information contained herein.  Use of the information contained herein provided by AsianInfo.org and any mistakes contained within are at the individual risk of the user. 

(We do not provide links to, or knowingly promote, any violent or pornographic sites.)


Suggestions  |  Organization Info  |  Become a Sponsor Privacy Statement

 Copyright 2010 AsianInfo.org - All Rights Reserved.- Copyright Policy